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Just back from Ladakh, India where I had the privilege of working with David Duchemin, Matt Brandon and 8 extremely talented photographers. We explored the bustling back streets of Old Delhi, the Sufi shrine of Nizamuddin and then headed up to the Khardungla Pass to cross the worlds highest motorable road at 18,380 feet. The road is situated on an ancient trade route from Leh to Kashgar in Central Asia, and it is also the gateway to the beautiful Nubra Valley. Some of the guys did it on motorcycles which looked spectacular but I’m a wimp after living in India for so many years. After witnessing the insanity that ensues on their roads, I’d prefer to make the journey on a camel. Yet, they were intrepid travelers and it was a delight to be able to work with such a spirited group. I can honestly say that we all learned from each other and I believe everyone became better photographers on this journey. I’ll be posting photos soon but I’m on my way to Prague.

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