Menu

Film for Ripple Effect Images

MediaStorm  created a beautiful film about my work with Ripple Effect Images. Our aim is to tell the stories that empower women around the world. Watch it HERE.

 

For photographer Ami Vitale, the pivotal moment occurred in Guinea-Bissau.

 

It was the start of her career and she was visiting her sister in the Peace Corp. Vitale expected Africa to be filled with war, famine, plague or the other extreme, exotic safaris.

 

Living in West Africa for six months showed her not only “how the majority of people on the planet live their day-to-day life,” but that people were not as hopeless as the newspapers portrayed. There was “a great deal of joy there.”

 

It is a revelation that has guided Vitale through 80 countries and a 13-year career.

 

Her original desire to take “beautiful pictures” was transformed into a desire to do justice to people and their stories. As a photographer Vitale’s focus has centered on issues surrounding women, poverty and health. The common denominator to all of her stories, she realized, is nature, specifically climate change. And it’s women who bare the brunt of those changes.

 

But when a woman is offered the tools to improve her situation, she runs with the opportunity. She transforms communities. “It’s a ripple effect,” says Vitale.

 

It’s the desire to see change that led Ami Vitale to join Ripple Effect Images, a photography organization started by Annie Griffiths that shares imagery with other changemakers.

 

“We are telling the stories that are so important and get lost in the headlines,” says Vitale. “They are the key to connecting things and allowing people to get engaged and make a difference.”]

 Nikon018

You May Also Enjoy



Tourists watch as Li Feng cares for two month old giant panda cubs at the Bifengxia Giant Panda Breeding and Research Center in Sichuan Province August 29, 2015.  Nearly 50 percent of giant pandas births are to twins, but the mothers can care for only one cub at a time so keepers in China have developed a careful process for swapping each baby so they are fed both by their mother and by hand. Baby pandas wean from their mothers between 8-9 months and a year old and generally stay with their mothers for 2 years. (Photo by Ami Vitale)

National Geographic Live

I am excited to continue my tour as one of the featured National Geographic photographers at the National Geographic Live series in Redwood City, CA, Aug. 16, 2016. My talk, titled “Rhinos, Rickshaws & Revolutions,” is about my exploration of the world from temples to war zones and rhinos to pandas. Tickets and information are available [ … ]

Read More

My 2015 World Press Photo winner displayed at Amsterdam Schiphol Airport.

Rhinos in Amsterdam Airport

If you are passing through the Amsterdam Schiphol Airport, check out my World Press Photo rhino  image on a billboard there. The image features the conservation work of Lewa Wildlife Conservancy and the Northern Rangelands Trust. Please follow their work on social media and consider a visit to Kenya to see them in action. Your support goes directly toward [ … ]

Read More

Featured Video Play Icon

Skillshare

Skillshare came with me to Venice Beach, California, where I share tools and practices of documentary photography for an online class. There are instructions for an exercise you can do at home and I can view your work being posted to Skillshare. If you use the link here to sign up, you can receive three months of Skillshare [ … ]

Read More